An Architecture Of Reuse, Built With Iridescent Curtains

The social issues of today has changed the course of architecture. Once “good” architecture created  from untouched sites and endless budgets; now, the trend is shifting more towards affordable and sustainable alternatives, such as adaptive reuse.

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At  this year’s  Venice Architecture Biennale, the Netherland Petra Blaisse  and her team have filled their space with a series of shimmering pink and silver curtains, hung on motorized frames that divide the expansive galleries into smaller spaces.

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The Dutch  pavilion’s interior changes every five minutes–accompanied by a soft whirr, transforming  the 1954 vacant building of the  pavilion throughout the entire length of the Biennale.

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 “We are not hanging Objets d’Art, exhibit works or stage events,” says Petra Blaisse, the textile designer and frequent Rem Koolhaas-collaborator behind Re-set. “We are responding to the vacant architecture itself.”

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Rather than stage an exhibition, like most other countries at the Biennale, Blaisse with the swishing of fabric–demonstrated how relatively low-cost, low-impact architectural interventions can re-animate abandoned spaces.

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Re-set is the sequel to the Dutch submission to the International Architecture Exhibition in 2010, titled Vacant NL, a presentation by the Netherlands Architecture Institute (NAI) and Rietveld Landscape that shed light on the huge amount and enormous potential of disused buildings in the Netherlands. 

 

2018-03-17T16:54:17+00:00

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